Björn Linder

Björn Linder

Bollebygd, Borås, X08, Sweden / By profession municipal bureaucrat. Amateur when it comes to running, photography and flying drones.
Björn Linder
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Funny pictures about The most interesting word in the English language. Oh, and cool pics about The most interesting word in the English language. Also, The most interesting word in the English language.

Playful New Murals and Paintings by ‘Wes21′ Fuse Technology, Humor, and the Natural World

Swiss street artist who calls himself and whose actual name is Remo Lienhard, creates playful street art paintings the main feature of which is the

DALeast through Jaume Plensa. Borås-Sweden. Photo: Björn Linder

DALeast through Jaume Plensa.

"The rare double skyhole". One of David Zinn's most frequent characters, Sluggo, showed up on the town square of central Borås. The next day the chalk painting was washed away by the rain. Photo: Björn Linder

"The rare double skyhole". One of David Zinn's most frequent characters, Sluggo, showed up on the town square of central Borås. The next day the chalk painting was washed away by the rain.

Apollon & Artemis. Detail from the mural of Pichi & Avo #nolimitboras Photo: Björn linder

Detail from the mural of Pichi & Avo Photo: Björn linder

Tristan Eaton finishing his mural for No Limit Borås. Photo: Björn Linder

Tristan Eaton finishing his mural for No Limit Borås.

"Berta and Tunda" by David Zinn. David Zinn is a self-taught artist living in Ann Arbor, Michigan. His small-scale fanciful creatures, often including a stalk-eyed green monster and a flying pig, are generally improvised on the street using chalk, charcoal and found objects. These etherial drawings generally wash away in the rain, but photographs of them have endured. Photo: Björn Linder

"Berta and Tunda" by David Zinn. David Zinn is a self-taught artist living in Ann Arbor, Michigan. His small-scale fanciful creatures, often including a stalk-eyed green monster and a flying pig, are generally improvised on the street using chalk, charcoal and found objects. These etherial drawings generally wash away in the rain, but photographs of them have endured. Photo: Björn Linder