Native Perennial & Shrubs Zone 5

Collection by Deanna Nelson

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Deanna Nelson
jewelweed (touch-me-not) poison ivy remedy

Poison Ivy, Oak, and Sumac more prevalent this year

This morning's Wall Street Journal has an article on the front page of the Personal Journal section on the Least Welcome Sign of Summer.

Black Cohosh (Actaea racemosa) Missouri native - Astilbe-like, deeply cut, tripinnate foliage is an attractive deep green.  Small numerous, creamy white, fragrant flowers in long, terminal racemes resembling fluffy spires.  Slow to establish.  Part shade to full shade - Blooms June to July.

Black Cohosh (Actaea racemosa) on the BRP

The tall, graceful wands of black bugbane are frequent along North Carolina's Blue Ridge Parkway in mid-July. They blossom at the same time as the tall Turk's Cap lilies, tall bellflowers, and a variety of other showy mid-summer wildflowers. This species is also called black cohosh or black baneberry. In addition to having a handful of common names, black bugbane/cohosh is also known as Cimicifuga racemosa.

Indian Paintbrush: Who can visit a prairie and keep their eyes from the bright red of Indian paintbrush? And who, pondering Indian paintbrush, can not contemplate the Osage, the Kansa, the Pawnee and many other people who lived in these prairies before the pioneers? | Missouri Department of Conservation

Indian Paintbrush

The bright red of Indian paintbrush colors our native prairielands, reminding us (through its name) of the Osage, Kansa, Pawnee, and many other people who lived in these prairies before the pioneers.

prairie dock

Prairie

Ohio Plants -

Blue-Eyed Mary: The flowers of this species are only about a half inch wide, but blue-eyed Mary makes up for it by usually appearing in abundance, covering a patch of forest floor with little sky-blue and white "faces." | Missouri Department of Conservation

Blue-Eyed Mary

The flowers of blue-eyed Mary are only about a half inch wide, but this pretty plant makes up for it by usually appearing in abundance, covering a patch of forest floor with little sky-blue and white “faces.”

Glade Coneflower: Missouri abounds with lovely wildflowers of every shape and color, but none are more elegant than the glade coneflower. | Missouri Conservationist

Plants and Animals

Bees, butterflies, birds and humans all welcome this graceful summer resident.

Orchids: A View of Our Tropical Missouri -- Areas of rugged terrain, calcareous soils and secret fens provide habitat for rare species. | Missouri Conservationist

Orchids: A View of Our Tropical Missouri

Areas of rugged terrain, calcareous soils and secret fens provide habitat for rare species.

tall bellflower plant | Campanula americana (Tall Bellflower)

Campanula americana - Tall Bellflower

Campanula americana, Tall Bellflower or American Bellflower, reaches from three to five feet in height, its blue-violet blooms providing a bright late-summer accent to savanna or woodland plantings. Self-seeding, it is either annual or biennial by habit, seemingly depending on when germination occurs. First-year plants are tight rosettes of heart-shaped leaves that shoot up the following spring to form tall stems. Because Campanula americana is the only bellflower with wide-spread…