Star formation

Galaxy Space Universe RePinned By: Live Wild Be Free www.livewildbefree.com Cruelty Free Lifestyle & Beauty Blog. Twitter & Instagram @livewild_befree Facebook http://facebook.com/livewildbefree

Galaxy Space Universe RePinned By: Live Wild Be Free www.livewildbefree.com Cruelty Free Lifestyle & Beauty Blog. Twitter & Instagram @livewild_befree Facebook http://facebook.com/livewildbefree

This galaxy, NGC 4565, is a disk galaxy viewed at nearly an edge-on angle. Galaxies like these are of particular interest for their links to star formation and the speeds at which galaxies rotate.

This galaxy, NGC 4565, is a disk galaxy viewed at nearly an edge-on angle. Galaxies like these are of particular interest for their links to star formation and the speeds at which galaxies rotate.

The Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our own Milky Way Galaxy, is home to one of the largest and most intense regions of star formation known to exist anywhere in our galactic neighborhood — the Tarantula Nebula. This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows both the spindly, spidery filaments of gas that inspired the region’s name, and the intriguing structure of stacked ‘bubbles’ that forms the so-called Honeycomb Nebula.

The Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our own Milky Way Galaxy, is home to one of the largest and most intense regions of star formation known to exist anywhere in our galactic neighborhood — the Tarantula Nebula. This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows both the spindly, spidery filaments of gas that inspired the region’s name, and the intriguing structure of stacked ‘bubbles’ that forms the so-called Honeycomb Nebula.

Inside the #CarinaNebula: Cropped from original 465 mb tif image. A towering “mountain” of cold hydrogen gas laced with dust is the site of new star formation in the Carina Nebula (NGC 3372). The great gas pillar is being eroded by the ultraviolet radiation from the hottest newborn stars in the nebula. This portion of the Carina Nebula is home to some of the most intense star formation in the Milky Way galaxy. Credit: NASA/Hubble

Inside the #CarinaNebula: Cropped from original 465 mb tif image. A towering “mountain” of cold hydrogen gas laced with dust is the site of new star formation in the Carina Nebula (NGC 3372). The great gas pillar is being eroded by the ultraviolet radiation from the hottest newborn stars in the nebula. This portion of the Carina Nebula is home to some of the most intense star formation in the Milky Way galaxy. Credit: NASA/Hubble

NASA. The Mountains of Creation nebula (W5) from the Spitzer space telescope. The image, dubbed the Mountains of Creation by astronomers, reveals hotbeds of star formation similar to the iconic Pillars of Creation within the Eagle Nebula, photographed in 1995 by the Hubble Space Telescope.

NASA. The Mountains of Creation nebula (W5) from the Spitzer space telescope. The image, dubbed the Mountains of Creation by astronomers, reveals hotbeds of star formation similar to the iconic Pillars of Creation within the Eagle Nebula, photographed in 1995 by the Hubble Space Telescope.

The Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our own Milky Way Galaxy, is home to one of the largest and most intense regions of star formation known to exist anywhere in our galactic neighborhood -- the Tarantula Nebula. This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows both the spindly, spidery filaments of gas that inspired the region’s name, and the intriguing structure of stacked ‘bubbles’ that forms the so-called Honeycomb Nebula.

The Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our own Milky Way Galaxy, is home to one of the largest and most intense regions of star formation known to exist anywhere in our galactic neighborhood -- the Tarantula Nebula. This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows both the spindly, spidery filaments of gas that inspired the region’s name, and the intriguing structure of stacked ‘bubbles’ that forms the so-called Honeycomb Nebula.

Magellanic Cloud Survey view of the Tarantula Nebula | The leader of the survey team, Maria-Rosa Cioni (University of Hertfordshire, UK) explains: "This view is of one of the most important regions of star formation in the local Universe, the spectacular 30 Doradus star-forming region, also called the Tarantula Nebula. At its core is a large cluster of stars called RMC 136, in which some of the most massive stars known are located."

Magellanic Cloud Survey view of the Tarantula Nebula | The leader of the survey team, Maria-Rosa Cioni (University of Hertfordshire, UK) explains: "This view is of one of the most important regions of star formation in the local Universe, the spectacular 30 Doradus star-forming region, also called the Tarantula Nebula. At its core is a large cluster of stars called RMC 136, in which some of the most massive stars known are located."

#Astronomy: An international team of astronomers, led by David Sobral from Leinden University of the Netherlands used three telescopes located across the globe to study the trends in star formation, from the earliest stars that made up the first galaxies in the universe, up until now. Their findings suggests something quite shocking .. almost 95% of stars that will ever live have already been born!

#Astronomy: An international team of astronomers, led by David Sobral from Leinden University of the Netherlands used three telescopes located across the globe to study the trends in star formation, from the earliest stars that made up the first galaxies in the universe, up until now. Their findings suggests something quite shocking .. almost 95% of stars that will ever live have already been born!

Dusty emission in the Tadpole nebula, IC 410, lies about 12,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Auriga. The cloud of glowing gas is over 100 light-years across, sculpted by stellar winds and radiation from embedded open star cluster NGC 1893. Formed in the interstellar cloud a mere 4 million years ago, bright cluster stars are seen all around the star-forming nebula.

Dusty emission in the Tadpole nebula, IC 410, lies about 12,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Auriga. The cloud of glowing gas is over 100 light-years across, sculpted by stellar winds and radiation from embedded open star cluster NGC 1893. Formed in the interstellar cloud a mere 4 million years ago, bright cluster stars are seen all around the star-forming nebula.

"Shockwaves of Star Formation - Galaxy M106 Galaxy M106 has mysterious “invisible” spiral arms that only become visible when you observe its X-rays. Astrophysicists believe that there is a supermassive black hole at the center of M106. It is theorized that this supermassive blackhole is jetting out high-energy particles into the galaxy’s shockwaves and causing these high energy emissions."

"Shockwaves of Star Formation - Galaxy M106 Galaxy M106 has mysterious “invisible” spiral arms that only become visible when you observe its X-rays. Astrophysicists believe that there is a supermassive black hole at the center of M106. It is theorized that this supermassive blackhole is jetting out high-energy particles into the galaxy’s shockwaves and causing these high energy emissions."

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