Inside the #CarinaNebula: Cropped from original 465 mb tif image. A towering “mountain” of cold hydrogen gas laced with dust is the site of new star formation in the Carina Nebula (NGC 3372). The great gas pillar is being eroded by the ultraviolet radiation from the hottest newborn stars in the nebula. This portion of the Carina Nebula is home to some of the most intense star formation in the Milky Way galaxy. Credit: NASA/Hubble

Inside the #CarinaNebula: Cropped from original 465 mb tif image. A towering “mountain” of cold hydrogen gas laced with dust is the site of new star formation in the Carina Nebula (NGC 3372). The great gas pillar is being eroded by the ultraviolet radiation from the hottest newborn stars in the nebula. This portion of the Carina Nebula is home to some of the most intense star formation in the Milky Way galaxy. Credit: NASA/Hubble

What are the Different Kinds of Supernovae? | Universe Today

What are the Different Kinds of Supernovae

What are the Different Kinds of Supernovae? | Universe Today

NASA. The Mountains of Creation nebula (W5) from the Spitzer space telescope. The image, dubbed the Mountains of Creation by astronomers, reveals hotbeds of star formation similar to the iconic Pillars of Creation within the Eagle Nebula, photographed in 1995 by the Hubble Space Telescope.

NASA. The Mountains of Creation nebula (W5) from the Spitzer space telescope. The image, dubbed the Mountains of Creation by astronomers, reveals hotbeds of star formation similar to the iconic Pillars of Creation within the Eagle Nebula, photographed in 1995 by the Hubble Space Telescope.

Making a Spectacle of Star Formation in Orion Credit: NASA/JPL/Spitzer via astronomicalwonders

Making a Spectacle of Star Formation in Orion Credit: NASA/JPL/Spitzer via astronomicalwonders

Psalm 19:1" The heavens declare the glory of God; And the firmament shows His handiwork." Star Formation In Orion Nebula

Psalm 19:1" The heavens declare the glory of God; And the firmament shows His handiwork." Star Formation In Orion Nebula

The Wonders of the Carina Nebula  “This broad image of the Carina Nebula, a region of massive star formation in the southern skies, was taken in infrared light using the HAWK-I camera on ESO’s Very Large Telescope. Many previously hidden features, scattered across a spectacular celestial landscape of gas, dust and young stars, have emerged.”Credit: ESO/ESO top 100

The Wonders of the Carina Nebula “This broad image of the Carina Nebula, a region of massive star formation in the southern skies, was taken in infrared light using the HAWK-I camera on ESO’s Very Large Telescope. Many previously hidden features, scattered across a spectacular celestial landscape of gas, dust and young stars, have emerged.”Credit: ESO/ESO top 100

Heart and Soul ~ W5: Pillars of Star Formation.  W5 is also known as IC 1848, and together with IC 1805 form a complex region of star formation popularly dubbed the Heart and Soul Nebulas.  W5 lies about 6,500 light years away toward the constellation of Cassiopeia.  Image Credit & Copyright: Lori Allen, Xavier Koenig (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA) et al., JPL-Caltech, NASA

Heart and Soul ~ W5: Pillars of Star Formation. W5 is also known as IC 1848, and together with IC 1805 form a complex region of star formation popularly dubbed the Heart and Soul Nebulas. W5 lies about 6,500 light years away toward the constellation of Cassiopeia. Image Credit & Copyright: Lori Allen, Xavier Koenig (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA) et al., JPL-Caltech, NASA

Dusty emission in the Tadpole nebula, IC 410, lies about 12,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Auriga. The cloud of glowing gas is over 100 light-years across, sculpted by stellar winds and radiation from embedded open star cluster NGC 1893. Formed in the interstellar cloud a mere 4 million years ago, bright cluster stars are seen all around the star-forming nebula.

Dusty emission in the Tadpole nebula, IC 410, lies about 12,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Auriga. The cloud of glowing gas is over 100 light-years across, sculpted by stellar winds and radiation from embedded open star cluster NGC 1893. Formed in the interstellar cloud a mere 4 million years ago, bright cluster stars are seen all around the star-forming nebula.

Some 60 million light-years away in the southerlyconstellation Corvus, two large galaxies are colliding. Stars in the two galaxies, cataloged as NGC 4038 and NGC 4039, very rarely collide in the course of the ponderous cataclysm that lasts for hundreds of millions of years. But the galaxies' large clouds of molecular gas and dust often do, triggering furious episodesof star formation near the center of the cosmic wreckage

Some 60 million light-years away in the southerlyconstellation Corvus, two large galaxies are colliding. Stars in the two galaxies, cataloged as NGC 4038 and NGC 4039, very rarely collide in the course of the ponderous cataclysm that lasts for hundreds of millions of years. But the galaxies' large clouds of molecular gas and dust often do, triggering furious episodesof star formation near the center of the cosmic wreckage

New ALMA observations reveal a forming star as it launches a wind from the edge of the disk that feeds it. The post ALMA Captures Star Formation in Action appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

New ALMA observations reveal a forming star as it launches a wind from the edge of the disk that feeds it. The post ALMA Captures Star Formation in Action appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

The supermassive black hole at the heart of Centaurus A is currently feeding on a smaller galaxy that "recently" collided. The shock of the collision compressed interstellar gas, precipitating a flurry of star formation.

The supermassive black hole at the heart of Centaurus A is currently feeding on a smaller galaxy that "recently" collided. The shock of the collision compressed interstellar gas, precipitating a flurry of star formation.

The Carina Nebula - A Birthplace Of Stars  The Carina Nebula lies at an estimated distance of 6,500 to 10,000 light years away from Earth in the constellation Carina. This nebula is one of the most well studied in astrophysics and has a high rate of star formation.

The Carina Nebula - A Birthplace Of Stars The Carina Nebula lies at an estimated distance of 6,500 to 10,000 light years away from Earth in the constellation Carina. This nebula is one of the most well studied in astrophysics and has a high rate of star formation.

Magellanic Cloud Survey view of the Tarantula Nebula | The leader of the survey team, Maria-Rosa Cioni (University of Hertfordshire, UK) explains: "This view is of one of the most important regions of star formation in the local Universe, the spectacular 30 Doradus star-forming region, also called the Tarantula Nebula. At its core is a large cluster of stars called RMC 136, in which some of the most massive stars known are located."

Magellanic Cloud Survey view of the Tarantula Nebula | The leader of the survey team, Maria-Rosa Cioni (University of Hertfordshire, UK) explains: "This view is of one of the most important regions of star formation in the local Universe, the spectacular 30 Doradus star-forming region, also called the Tarantula Nebula. At its core is a large cluster of stars called RMC 136, in which some of the most massive stars known are located."

This new view of the Orion A star-formation cloud from ESA’s Herschel space observatory shows the turbulent region of space that hugs the famous Orion Nebula.

This new view of the Orion A star-formation cloud from ESA’s Herschel space observatory shows the turbulent region of space that hugs the famous Orion Nebula.

A perfect 10 for the Hubble Space Telescope! This once-in-a-lifetime image shows a pair of gravitationally interacting galaxies called Arp 147. The galaxy on the left, or the "one", is relatively undisturbed, whereas the galaxy on the right, or the "zero", is a messy ring of intense star formation.  Image credit: NASA, ESA and M. Livio (STScI)

A perfect 10 for the Hubble Space Telescope! This once-in-a-lifetime image shows a pair of gravitationally interacting galaxies called Arp 147. The galaxy on the left, or the "one", is relatively undisturbed, whereas the galaxy on the right, or the "zero", is a messy ring of intense star formation. Image credit: NASA, ESA and M. Livio (STScI)

Good Info on Star Formation and astronomy

Good Info on Star Formation and astronomy

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