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The Cell: An Image Library - Image CIL:41063

diatoms on red alga.theres always something living off / on a host. If surrounding s r right?

A microscopic sea creature known as a diatom has a shell which does not decompose when it dies.

Diatoms are a major group of algae, and are one of the most common types of phytoplankton, major producers of oxygen.

A light micrograph of a thin slice through a cup fungus called Peziza. It grows on decaying wood and organic matter and reproduces itself by producing ascospores. This section shows the fungus' spore containers (asci) each with eight ascospores (shown in brown). As the spores mature, fluid builds up behind them; when the pressure gets too much the tops of the asci open and the spores are flung out into the air. They can cause allergy and irritation in humans including conditions such as…

Pattern: A light micrograph of a thin slice through a cup fungus called Peziza. It grows on decaying wood and organic matter and reproduces itself by producing ascospores.

2012 PHOTOMICROGRAPHY COMPETITION  Wolfgang Bettighofer  Dataport  Kiel, Germany    Subject Matter:  Mediopyxis helysia (diatom) (250x)  Technique:  Differential Interference Contrast

Wolfgang Bettighofer of Dataport in Kiel, Germany created this image using differential interference contrast. The photograph of Mediopyxis helysia (diatom) was an Image of Distinction in the 2012 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition.

Life in a drop of seawater. By David Liittschwager

Amazing shot by David Littschwager of a single drop of sea water magnified by 25 times. Reminds me of a Gitman Vintage shirt

Phytoplankton never looked so sparkly. These diatoms, or single-celled algae species, glitter under the microscope like tiny jewels. Diatoms form the basis of many a marine food chain, and they're protected by cell walls made of silica, seen here. When diatoms die, their cell walls form diatomaceous earth, a sediment used in pool filters and some kitty litter. Researchers use diatom deposits as one way to understand the conditions of ancient lakes and bogs.

Magnificent Microphotography: 50 Tiny Wonders

Image: Lavender pollen grain (© Cheryl Power/Science Photo Library/Corbis)

Lavender Pollen Grain (Lavandula dentata) Ref: scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a pollen grain (yellow) amongst the petal (papilla) cells (purple) of a French lavender (Lavandula dentata) flower. Magnification: when printed 10 centimetres wide.

Diatom frustules Science Image  Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Mastogloia splendida (oval) and Navicula palpebralis (elongated) diatom frustules. Magnification: x2,490 when printed 10cm wide

Diatom frustules Science Image Colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Mastogloia splendida (oval) and Navicula palpebralis (elongated) diatom frustules. Magnification: when printed wide

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