Children of plantation sharecropper Lonnie Fair preparing food on wood stove in sparsely furnished shack.  1936...not to long ago...

The children of plantation sharecropper Lonnie Fair preparing food on wood stove in a sparsely furnished shack. Scott, Mississippi, USA, (Photograph by Alfred Eisenstaedt.

Unknown II. Portraits of Ex-Slaves 1930's

The last faces of American slavery: Stunning pictures of men and women who were born into slavery and photographed more than 70 years after being freed.

5 generations on Smith’s plantation, Beaufort, SC This family was photographed in 1862 after Union forces captured coastal area of SC. Taken by Timothy O’Sullivan at the J. J. Smith plantation, this picture was exhibited at Alexander Gardner’s Washington, D.C., photography gallery in September 1863. In contrast to this South Carolina family, the history of the slaves was usually marked by efforts of enslaved African Americans to maintain family in the face of forced break-ups and sales.

Five generations on Smith’s Plantation, Beaufort, South Carolina ca 1862 - slavery plantation

Russell Lee - New Madrid County, Missouri. Child of sharecropper cultivating cotton (1938)

New Madrid County, Missouri. Child of sharecropper cultivating cotton, 1938 Russell Lee - Photographer

Black Indian Family

FAMILY Many Native Americans welcomed African Americans into their villages. Even as slaves many African Americans became part of a family group, and many intermarried with Native Americans - thus many later became classified as Black Indians

Article by African Globe (www.africanglobe.net) | Photo of Aboriginal slaves and slave owner | Indigenous Australia | http://www.lifeintheknow.com/iconic-images-of-our-time/

Until the the Aborigines, or Aboriginal Australians, came under the Flora And Fauna Act that classified them as animals, not human beings. This also meant that killing an Aborigine meant you weren’t killing a human being, but an animal.

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