Pinterest

Explore Science Geek, Microscopic Images, and more!

MICROSCOPIC HAIRS IN INNER EAR:  Inner ear help divers (like the one in today's pic) know their up down orientation in water.  Sounds under water are magnified. When we hear sounds (whether under water or above) microscopic hairs in our inner ears vibrate.

MICROSCOPIC HAIRS IN INNER EAR: Inner ear help divers know their up down orientation in water. Sounds under water are magnified. When we hear sounds (whether under water or above) microscopic hairs in our inner ears vibrate.

The name rotifer is derived from Latin (rota="wheel"; fera="to bear") and refers to the crown of cilia that surrounds the corona (head) of this animal, which is used for locomotion and feeding. The cilia are arranged in two circles and when they are beating, resemble two wheels spinning.

The name rotifer is derived from Latin (rota="wheel"; fera="to bear") and refers to the crown of cilia that surrounds the corona (head) of this animal, which is used for locomotion and feeding. The cilia are arranged in two circles and when they are beating, resemble two wheels spinning.

Rotifers Rotifers are tiny multicellular organisms found commonly in freshwater environments around the world. Image by Dr. Igor Siwanowicz, HHMI Janelia Farm Research Campus.

Igor Siwanowicz HHMI Janelia Farm Research Campus Ashburn, Virginia, United States Specimen: Rotifers around a single-cell green alga (desmid Staurastrum sexangulare).

Stunning Images of Pollen, the Hidden Sexuality of Flowers

Stunning Images of Pollen, the Hidden Sexuality of Flowers

Stellaria holostea, Greater stitchwort pollen [Rob Kesseler] (No wonder so many people have allergies with this stuff shoved up one's nose)

Human embryo in the eye of a needle. In case I needed a reminder of the miracle I carried within my body.

Embryo in the eye of a needle.shows how small that embryo really is! (Photo by Endless Forms Most Beautiful)

"Victorian" marine dinoflagellates

It’s not hard to have figured out the benefits of supplementing our diets with Marine Phytoplankton.

Advertisments for scanning electron microscopes take you into the world of nano-monsters @Jaimie Schweiger

Advertisments for scanning electron microscopes take you into the world of nano-monsters

coccolithophorid - marine organism Courtesy of Philippe Crassous Image Details Instrument used: Quanta Family Magnification: 14269 Horizontal Field Width: micron Vacuum: mbar Voltage: 10 Spot: Working Distance: 10 mm Detector: SE

eye of honey bee #beautiful

honeybee's eye at by Ralph Grimm: 20 BioScapes Contest Photos--Life Viewed through the Microscope - Scientific American

Dinoflagellate: any of numerous chiefly marine plankton of the ...

Dinoflagellate: any of numerous chiefly marine plankton of the phylum Pyrrophyta (or, in some classification schemes, the order Dinoflagellata), usually having two flagella, one in a groove around the body and the other extending from its cente

#MICROSCOPIC  http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/micropolitan/marine/radiolaria/index.html

Radiolarians from the genus Podocyrtis (Lampterium) from the Tertiary deposits of Barbados.

Foraminifera : Calcarina hispida Brady found near Great Barrier Reef, Australia on a beach by family Meyer : 380 micron : ( = 0.38 millimetres ) . SEM picture taken by Dr. Rosenfeldt head of the Mikrobiologische Vereinigung of the Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein in Hamburg .http://www.foraminifera.eu/singimg/calcarina-hispida-portcampbell.jpg

FOR THE AGES Single-celled foraminifera helped to create the materials used in some of the world’s great monuments, and are also very valuable in telling Earth’s history because they produce shells that make good fossils.

I am currently obsessed with diatoms, they are amazing creatures. And yes, the beautiful things are living

really should look into biology ! Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Campylodiscus hibernicus, a freshwater diatom. Magnification: when printed wide.