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Bascinet, Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin 1380-1400 ref_arm_1500_002

Bascinet, Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin 1380-1400 ref_arm_1500_002

Visor:  Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nuremburg, Germany  Inventory Number: W1567  Date: 1350-1400.  Publications: The Knight and the Blast Furnace. Alan Williams (p. 341)

Visor: Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nuremburg, Germany Inventory Number: W1567 Date: 1350-1400. Publications: The Knight and the Blast Furnace. Alan Williams (p. 341)

Bascinet, Musee Nacional du Moyen Age (Musee Cluny), Paris  1380-1400 ref_arm_1552_002

Bascinet, Musee Nacional du Moyen Age (Musee Cluny), Paris 1380-1400 ref_arm_1552_002

This helm is now probably in a private collection. (helm basel?)

This helm is now probably in a private collection. (helm basel?)

Visor, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nuremberg 1350-1380 German ref_arm_1544_001

Visor, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nuremberg 1350-1380 German ref_arm_1544_001

pembridge great helm - Google Search

pembridge great helm - Google Search

Bildresultat för 1380 armour

Bildresultat för 1380 armour

A mid-14th century knight, wearing mail under his plate armour, would wear 30 kilos of armour, but it's because he wears the said mail under the plates. These plates were quite thin, actually way thinner than the ones used for reenactment (for safety). Here is a 14th century great helm. The helmet weighs 2,6 kg, and thickness of the steel varies between 0,6 and 1,8 mm. It's extremely thin. Cutting through plates must have been rare, but not impossible.

A mid-14th century knight, wearing mail under his plate armour, would wear 30 kilos of armour, but it's because he wears the said mail under the plates. These plates were quite thin, actually way thinner than the ones used for reenactment (for safety). Here is a 14th century great helm. The helmet weighs 2,6 kg, and thickness of the steel varies between 0,6 and 1,8 mm. It's extremely thin. Cutting through plates must have been rare, but not impossible.

A little article on the history of the codpiece… by Lucy Worsley "So what exactly is this controversial garment?  The codpiece is buttoned, or tied with strings, to a man’s breeches.  It takes its name from the word ‘cod’, middle English for both ‘bag’ and ‘scrotum’, and arose because medieval men wore hose – essentially, very long socks – beneath their doublets, and nothing else in the way of underwear." arrmour-codpiece

A little article on the history of the codpiece… by Lucy Worsley "So what exactly is this controversial garment? The codpiece is buttoned, or tied with strings, to a man’s breeches. It takes its name from the word ‘cod’, middle English for both ‘bag’ and ‘scrotum’, and arose because medieval men wore hose – essentially, very long socks – beneath their doublets, and nothing else in the way of underwear." arrmour-codpiece

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