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"Tel Halaf" Fertility Figurine  Syrian (Artist)  PERIOD : 5000-4000 BC  MEDIUM  terracotta with traces of pigment   MEASUREMENTS  3 3/16 x 1 15/16 x 2 1/8 in.   (8.15 x 5 x 5.46 cm)  via > art.thewalters.org

ancientpeoples: “ “Tel Halaf” Fertility Figurine Syria BC Terracotta with traces of pigment “As early as the millennium BC, cultures in the Near East began to create organized.

This seated goddess is not based on any specific fertility figurine, but was inspired by plump, seated goddesses found in the neolithic settlement at Catal Huyuk, Anatolia. She is 5 inches high and is 3.8 inches at her widest point. Each figurine is individually hand made, imperfections are to be expected and no two sculptures are alike and can never be reproduced to the exact same effect. They are one of a kind and unique.

This seated goddess is not based on any specific fertility figurine, but was inspired by plump, seated goddesses found in the neolithic settlement at Catal Huyuk, Anatolia.

Neolithic Fertility Goddess   Origin: Anatolia   Circa: 6000BC to 4000BC

Increase Chances of Pregnancy - 8 Ways to Boost Your Odds

Neolithic Fertility Goddess Origin: Anatolia Circa: to .elbows form eye shape of idoli

NEOLITHIC ANATOLIAN Mother Goddess on feline throne (birthing chair?). Figurine from Level II, Catal Huyuk. (c. 5700 BCE) Turkey.

Mother Goddess on feline throne (possibly a birthing chair), ca. The Neolithic Anatolian Figurine from Level II, Catal Huyuk, Turkey.

A SYRIAN TERRACOTTA FEMALE FIGURE TEL HALAF CULTURE, CIRCA 5TH MILLENNIUM B.C.

A SYRIAN TERRACOTTA FEMALE FIGURE TEL HALAF CULTURE, CIRCA 5TH MILLENNIUM B.C.

Art néolithique - Les Musées Barbier-Mueller

Female figurine early neolithic period Catal Höyük or Hacılar - Les Musées Barbier-Mueller

Violin idol,  Ancient Near East.  circa 2700 - 2100 B.C.E.  Representations of the agricultural fertility "Mother Goddess" were commonly buried in graves, particularly those of children, likely indicating a belief in life after death.

Violin idol, Ancient Near East. circa 2700 - 2100 B. Representations of the agricultural fertility "Mother Goddess" were commonly buried in graves, particularly those of children, likely indicating a belief in life after death.

Carved Ivory Mesopotamian Votive Figurine of the Goddess Ishtar, Circa 3000 BCE. Ishtar, known as Inanna to the Sumerians, was universal as a goddess in various forms in the ancient middle east. She was the Akkadian supreme goddess of sexual love and fertility and was also the goddess of war, ‘the lady of battles’. Her symbol was an eight pointed star that was identified with the planet Venus; later the Romans knew her by this name.

Carved Ivory Mesopotamian Votive Figurine of the Goddess Ishtar - circa BCE. Ishtar, known as Inanna to the Sumerians, was universal as a goddess in various forms in the ancient middle east

Woman - Western Iran, 1350-800 B.C. - Ceramic Sculpture  http://www.pinterest.com/rico37/art-sculptures-arts-premiers-et-tribaux/

Woman Western Iran, B. Sculpture Ceramic Height: 14 in. cm) Gift of Alice A.

Venus from Kostenki. Ancient goddess figurine from Kostenki, Voronezh region, Russia. Own cast.

Venus from Kostenki. Ancient goddess figurine from Kostenki, Voronezh region, Russia.

Neolithic Anatolia ca 5500 http://www.pinterest.com/MargaGrauenfels/historical-artifacts-fertility-idols-ancestral-mot/

Anatolia Goddess : Neolithic Anatolia ca 5500 Published January 2016 at 236 × 328 in Ancient Mythology and Current Reality Part One

SELÇUKLU HEYKEL SANATI - Türk Kozmolojisi

Uncommon art from Iran. Large Seated Woman and child. 12 in stucco. Perhaps the ancient Iranic goddess Anahita or a non-Islamic decorative figure. Seljuks were Islamic-Turks and their art contains Anatolian traditions

New Stone Age early clay figurine, Nea Nikomedeia, Thessaly, Greece 6000-5500BC

New Stone Age early clay figurine, Nea Nikomedeia, Thessaly, Greece

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