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Beatrice Tetley, psychiatric patient at Wakefield Hospital for melancholy, 1897

turbine-wax-heart: Beatrice Tetley, psychiatric patient at Wakefield Hospital for melancholy, 1897 (via)

old insane asylums“I suppose you want a photograph of a madwoman,” said this woman, name unknown, to photographer and medical superintendent Frederic Truby King. “I’d better stick some straw in my hair and make faces.” She was a patient at New Zealand’s Seacliff Lunatic Asylum in the early 1900’s.

Frederic Truby King, the medical superintendent at Seacliff Lunatic Asylum near Dunedin, New Zealand, often photographed his patients for th.

Portraits of patients at Victorian lunatic asylum treated for 'mania and melancholia' | Daily Mail Online

Harrowing pictures of the mentally ill housed in Victorian asylum

Psychiatric Patients (Hospital Vilardebó, 1907-1909) TERESA C.

This mundus tenebrosus, this shadowy world of mankind, is sunk into night; there is no field without its demons, and lunatics speak prophesies while the wise men fall into the pit.

Susannah Brown, a 38 year old worsted weaver admitted in January 1891, detailed that her “father is said to have been insane; died from phthisis 30 years ago. Patient’s uncle died insane at another asylum. Grandmother was insane when she died.”- female patient case notes from the Wakefield Asylum

As research assistant on the project, I share Rob’s feeling of being swamped! The sheer number of female patient case notes from the Wakefield Asylum dating from between 1818 to 1900 is stagg…

“As for Lucille, at fourteen, her story is less clear. A convent education in Switzerland, the news account says. But I suspect a different sort of institution.”

Patient: Harriet Jordan seen disheveled in her Bethlem Royal Hospital portrait as newly diagnosed with acute mania.

Sent to the Asylum: The Victorian Women Locked Up Because They Were Suffering From Stress, Post Natal Depression and Anxiety

Sent to the asylum: The Victorian women locked up because they were suffering from stress, post natal depression and anxiety

Her Story: Sent to the Asylum: Victorian Women Locked Up Because They Were Suffering From Stress, Post Natal Depression and Anxiety. I'd have been locked up too and I'm only O.

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