Explore Curiosity Rover, Curiosity Mars, and more!

This view combines several frames taken by the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity, looking into a valley to the west from the eastern side of a dune at the eastern end of the valley.

Go West, Young Rover

Go West, Young Rover The team operating NASA's Curiosity Mars rover will likely drive the rover westward over a dune and across a valley with fewer sharp rock hazards than alternative routes.

NASA photo of Mars from the rover Curiosity

The most incredible virtual tour of mars yet! Interactive graphic that lets you rotate camera on Nasa's Curiosity Rover

Curiosity Rover looking south, sol 173, Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

Curiosity Rover looking south, sol Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

Panoramic View From 'Rocknest'

Mars Exploration

Panoramic View From 'Rocknest' Position of Curiosity Mars Rover. This panorama is a mosaic of images taken by the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on the NASA Mars rover Curiosity while the rover was working at a site called "Rocknest" in October and November

Mars'ta antik nehir yatağı bulundu.

Water on Mars: Curiosity rover investigated an area on Mars named Hottah, which appears to be part of an ancient riverbed.

Mars 360 degree panorama [click through to view] taken by the Opportunity rover (not by Curiosity)

Mars 360 degree panorama [click through to view] taken by the Opportunity rover (not by Curiosity)

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover used the camera on its arm on July 12, 2014, to catch the first images of sparks produced by the rover's laser being shot at a rock on Mars. The left image is from before the laser zapped this rock, called "Nova." The spark is at the center of the right image.

First Imaging of Laser-Induced Spark on Mars

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover used the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera on its arm to catch the first images of sparks produced by the rover’s laser being shot at a rock on Mars.

The Curiosity rover sees a blue-tinted sunset on Mars.

Curiosity rover's blue Mars sunset blows away all your attempts at photography

IAES Exploring Space: The Curiosity rover sees a blue-tinted sunset on Mars.

Mars image taken by Curiosity - 'Rocknest' From Sol 52 Location  This patch of windblown sand and dust downhill from a cluster of dark rocks is the "Rocknest" site, which has been selected as the likely location for first use of the scoop on the arm of NASA's Mars rover Curiosity.

This patch of windblown sand and dust downhill from a cluster of dark rocks is the Rocknest site studied by Mars rover Curiosity. The Rocknest patch is about 8 feet by 16 feet meters by 5 meters) and may contain perchlorate salts.

Curiosity Rover's Epic New Panorama of the Sands of Mars - Wired Science

Curiosity Rover’s Epic New Panorama of the Sands of Mars

Curiosity Rover& Epic New Panorama of the Sands of Mars - Wired Science

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