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Islamic Egyptian handkerchief from Mamluk period (1250-1517)--Reversible Blackwork. Same on back/front...

(from West Kingdom Needleworker's Guild) It dates from sometime in the Mamluk period and is carefully worked to be completely reversible. Ellis suggests it might have b.

Textiles in the Nubia Museum in Aswan.

Neckline is an example from the Nubia Museum. This image of the neckline belongs to Professor Michael J. Fuller, from his personal photos,I used with his consent in research I have done on Mamluk garment construction.

pattern darned neckline:  Mamluk embroidery: pink and brown cotton darned into a linen yoke.  Ashmolean Museum, via Middle Eastern Dance Guild.

Mamluk embroidery on garb

Fragment from the neck opening of a tunic with crosses and diamond-shapes Egypt Mamluk Period - Material and technique linen, embroidered with pink silk and brown thread, possibly cotton; remains of lining; with stitching in flax

Egypt    Fragment, 13th/14th century    Linen, plain weave; embroidered with silk floss in back and running (pattern darning) stitches  9.7 x 10.2 cm (3 7/8 x 4 in.)

embroidered with silk floss in back and running (pattern darning) stitches x cm x 4 in.

Early Oriental 13th century Tiraz  fragment of cloth from the Ayyubid or Mamluk Period

Early Oriental century Tiraz fragment of cloth from the Ayyubid or Mamluk Period

1,000 year old Egyptian embroidery

© Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford Part of a tunic front with geometric pattern and birds Egypt Mamluk Period - linen, embroidered with coloured silk; with seams in flax Ashmolean Museum, Univ of Oxford

Egypt    Border, 13th/14th century    Linen, plain weave; embroidered with silk floss in double running stitch

Egypt, Border or C. embroidered with silk floss in double running stitch x cm x 2 in.) Held at the Art Institute of Chicago (website: www.

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