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Aida Overton Walker in 1907    Aida Overton Walker, born in 1880. She was a singer, dancer, actress, and choreographer, regarded as the leading African-American female performing artist at the turn of the century.

Aida Overton Walker in 1907 Aida Overton Walker, born in 1880. She was a singer, dancer, actress, and choreographer, regarded as the leading African-American female performing artist at the turn of the century.

Portrait of Captain T. Shorey and family, Oakland, CA 1898 #black_history #african_american

Portrait of Captain T. Shorey and family, Oakland, CA 1898 #black_history #african_american

Maggie Laura, Elizabeth, Armstead, and Mamie……the grandchildren of Maggie L. Walker, became the first woman of any race to found and become president of an American bank.

Maggie Laura, Elizabeth, Armstead, and Mamie……the grandchildren of Maggie L. Walker, became the first woman of any race to found and become president of an American bank.

Before Madam C.J. Walker there was Annie Turnbo Malone, " The Forgotten Entrepreneur" (1869-1957)  A chemist and entrepreneur, Annie Turnbo Malone became a millionaire by successfully developing and marketing hair products for black women in St. Louis. She used her wealth to promote the advancement of African Americans and gave away most of her money to charity.

Before Madam C.J. Walker there was Annie Turnbo Malone, " The Forgotten Entrepreneur" (1869-1957) A chemist and entrepreneur, Annie Turnbo Malone became a millionaire by successfully developing and marketing hair products for black women in St. Louis. She used her wealth to promote the advancement of African Americans and gave away most of her money to charity.

Maggie Walker first african american president of a bank 1903

Maggie Walker first african american president of a bank 1903

Sarah Rector--By the age of 10, she became the richest Black child in America. She received a land grant from the Creek Nation as part of reparations. Soon after, oil was discovered on her property. By 1912, the revenue from this oil was $371,000 per year (roughly $6.5 million today). Despite various attempts to steal her land and fortune, Sarah resisted. She went on to attend Tuskegee University and eventually settled in Kansas City, Missouri where her mansion still stands.

Sarah Rector--By the age of 10, she became the richest Black child in America. She received a land grant from the Creek Nation as part of reparations. Soon after, oil was discovered on her property. By 1912, the revenue from this oil was $371,000 per year (roughly $6.5 million today). Despite various attempts to steal her land and fortune, Sarah resisted. She went on to attend Tuskegee University and eventually settled in Kansas City, Missouri where her mansion still stands.

Black Abolitionists: Thomas Mundy Peterson The First African American To Vote Under The 15th Amendment - https://blackthen.com/black-abolitionists-thomas-mundy-peterson-first-african-american-vote-15th-amendment/?utm_source=PN&utm_medium=BT+Pinterest&utm_campaign=SNAP%2Bfrom%2BBlack+Then

Black Abolitionists: Thomas Mundy Peterson The First African American To Vote Under The 15th Amendment - https://blackthen.com/black-abolitionists-thomas-mundy-peterson-first-african-american-vote-15th-amendment/?utm_source=PN&utm_medium=BT+Pinterest&utm_campaign=SNAP%2Bfrom%2BBlack+Then

Inspiring

Inspiring

Jane Bolin was the first black woman judge in the United States.  Born April 11, 1908 in Poughkeepsie, New York, Bolin always knew she wanted to be a lawyer. Her father, Gaius Bolin, the first African American graduate of Williams College, practiced law in Poughkeepsie. Bolin graduated from Wellesley College in 1928, and received her law degree from Yale University School of Law in 1931.

Jane Bolin was the first black woman judge in the United States. Born April 11, 1908 in Poughkeepsie, New York, Bolin always knew she wanted to be a lawyer. Her father, Gaius Bolin, the first African American graduate of Williams College, practiced law in Poughkeepsie. Bolin graduated from Wellesley College in 1928, and received her law degree from Yale University School of Law in 1931.

Mary Fields, nickname Stagecoach Mary, was a former slave who became the first African-American woman to work for the US postal service when, about age 60, she was the fastest applicant to hitch up a team of 6 horses in the Montana Territory. She wore a pistol under her apron and when the snow was too deep for the horses she would carry the mail on her back and deliver it on snowshoes. She never missed a day. When the town of Cascade banned women from saloons, the mayor granted her an…

Mary Fields, nickname Stagecoach Mary, was a former slave who became the first African-American woman to work for the US postal service when, about age 60, she was the fastest applicant to hitch up a team of 6 horses in the Montana Territory. She wore a pistol under her apron and when the snow was too deep for the horses she would carry the mail on her back and deliver it on snowshoes. She never missed a day. When the town of Cascade banned women from saloons, the mayor granted her an…

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