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Detail from the Lachish Relief, found in the Assyrian king Sennacherib’s Great Palace at Nineveh (around 700-680 BCE).  The British Museum, London, UK

Detail from the Lachish Relief, found in the Assyrian king Sennacherib’s Great Palace at Nineveh (around BCE). The British Museum, London, UK

Akkad - LookLex Encyclopaedia.  Map shows  Akkad empire and the Sumerian Empire of Mesopotamia.  These empires would have occurred after the division of languages.

Map shows Akkad empire and the Sumerian Empire of Mesopotamia. These empires would have occurred after the division of languages.

Assur Relieft 10th-6th BCE Tower with defenders. Assyrians attack the Jewish fortified town of Lachish (battle 701 BCE). Part of a relief from the palace of Sennacherib at Niniveh, Mesopotamia (Iraq)

Relief BC, Tower with defenders - Assyrians attack the Jewish fortified town of Lachish (battle ~ 701 BC); part of a relief from the palace of Sennacherib at Niniveh, Mesopotamia (modern day Iraq).

Amber

Assyrian archers depicted in a relief from the South-West Palace of Nineveh. The British Museum, London, UK.

A unique collection of 3,000 year old ivory carvings excavated from this ancient city goes on exhibit starting next week at the British Museum. Anchor Marco Werman gets details from the British Museum's Middle East expert John Curtis.

A unique collection of year old ivory carvings excavated from this ancient city goes on exhibit starting next week at the British Museum. Anchor Marco Werman gets details from the British Museum's Middle East expert John Curtis.

Ishtar Lion

New Moon in Leo

The Ishtar Lion from the (reconstructed) Ishtar Gate of Babylon. Also part of a very beautiful tattoo (I love it that much!

Detail. The Balawat Gates, the huge bronze gates of king Shalmaneser III (858-824 BCE) from Balawat, an ancient Neo-Assyrian city near Nimrud (Kalhu), northern Iraq. The greater part of the gates has decayed and deteriorated over time, leaving behind a collection of inscribed bronze bands that describe the exploits and lives of the Assyrian Kings. Reconstruction from the British Museum.

Detail. The Balawat Gates, the huge bronze gates of king Shalmaneser III (858-824 BCE) from Balawat, an ancient Neo-Assyrian city near Nimrud (Kalhu), northern Iraq. The greater part of the gates has decayed and deteriorated over time, leaving behind a collection of inscribed bronze bands that describe the exploits and lives of the Assyrian Kings. Reconstruction from the British Museum.

He greatly improved the civil administration of his empire, reducing the influence of hitherto powerful nobles, regional governors and viceroys, and deporting troublesome peoples to other parts of his vast empire, setting the template for all future ancient empires

He greatly improved the civil administration of his empire, reducing the influence of hitherto powerful nobles, regional governors and viceroys, and deporting troublesome peoples to other parts of his vast empire, setting the template for all future ancient empires

Anunnaki with wings

Assyrian lion statues, i want some of these in an upper garden area, my own 'hanging gardens of babylon, overlooking a pool

Lion, symbol of the Babylonian goddess Ishtar, from the Ishtar Gate was the eighth gate to the inner city of Babylon. It was constructed in about 575 BCE by order of King Nebuchadnezzar II.

Detail of the Ishtar Gate

Lion, symbol of the Babylonian goddess Ishtar, from the Ishtar-Gate ancient-history

ASSUR RELIEF 10TH-6TH BCE Men carrying goods, cover of a wooden door. Fragment of a bronze sheet (858-824 BCE) from the palace of Shalmaneser III. Yeni-Assur (Tell Balawat), Mesopotamia (Iraq) British Museum, London, Great Britain

ASSUR RELIEF BCE Men carrying goods, cover of a wooden door. Fragment of a bronze sheet BCE) from the palace of Shalmaneser III. Yeni-Assur (Tell Balawat), Mesopotamia (Iraq) British Museum, London, Great Britain

Assyrian Artifact - British Museum 3

Assyrian Artifact - British Museum 3

The Uruk Vase showing worshippers bringing provisions to the temple of Inanna.  [The vase was stolen from the Iraq Museum in 2003, but has since been returned and partially restored.]  Uruk ca. 3000 BC

Uruk Vase showing worshippers bringing provisions to the temple of Inanna. Uruk, ca. 3000 BC [The vase was stolen from the Iraq Museum in but has since been returned and partially restored.

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