guldgubbar offrades för kanske tur eller beskydd, i uppåkra hittades 200 st guldgubbar i ett stolphål..!!!

Gold men sacrificed for maybe luck or protection, from a find of 200 like pieces found in Uppåkra, Sweden

The clothes of the richest women were depicted on pendants. These show us that there were significant variations in their attire. Women are often seen wearing pinafores, trains and cloaks, that could be decorated with various bands and border stitching.  Photo by the National Museum of Denmark

The clothes of the richest women were depicted on pendants. These show us that there were significant variations in their attire. Women are often seen wearing pinafores, trains and cloaks, that could be decorated with various bands and border stitching.

Viking pendants typically depict the woman's hair, which is often long, as tied up in a bun at the back of the head. Photo by the National Museum of Denmark

Viking pendants typically depict the woman's hair, which is often long, as tied up in a bun at the back of the head. Photo by the National Museum of Denmark

Uppåkra - a prehistoric central place

Bronze patrix to gold-foil figure. Dated to Late Scandinavian Iron Age (AD Height 2 cm viking

Gold-foil figure. Small gold-foil plaques with human figures. Over one hundred gold-foil figures have been discovered in Uppåkra. Dated to Late Scandinavian Iron Age (AD 400-1050). Height 2,1 cm. Sweden. (Photography by Bengt Almgren, LUHM)

Small gold-foil plaques with human figures. Over one hundred gold-foil figures have been discovered in Uppåkra. Dated to Late Scandinavian Iron Age (AD Height cm. (Photography by Bengt Almgren, LUHM)

Reykjavik_-_Thor-Figur_1.jpg (JPEG-bild, 1920 × 2560 pixlar) - Skalad (28%)

A seated bronze statue of Thor (about cm) known as the Eyarland statue from about AD 1000 was recovered at a farm near Akureyri, Iceland and is a featured display at the National Museum of Iceland.

Freja

Pendant in the shape of a woman, most likely the godess Freja. From grave in Aska, Hagebyhöga socken, Östergötland, Sweden.

Cnut (Canute) the Great, later also the king of Denmark, was the king of England from 1016 until his death in 1035. He was undoubtedly the most powerful king in the Viking-age Scandinavia. This beautiful illustration from the New Minster Liber Vitae, in Winchester, is the only known portrait of him and his English wife, Emma.

A history of the Viking world – in 10 extraordinary objects

Parched … a detail from the Liber Vitae manuscript. Photograph: The British Library Board.

http://www.historiska.se/ImageVault/Images/id_853/scope_0/filename_X8Z58O8U0bE7rjCw3N_t.jpg/storage_Edited/webSafe_1/ImageVaultHandler.aspx

16509 Ancient Bronze God Frö Lunda, with ancient boner, Södermanland, Sweden Sverige

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