Östermalmstorg Östermalmstorg – Siri Derkert Designed during the height of Cold War tensions as a potential shelter in case of nuclear war, Östermalmstorg features the work of Derkert (1965), one of Sweden’s most famous artists in the 20th century

The art of the Stockholm metro – in pictures

Östermalmstorg Östermalmstorg – Siri Derkert Designed during the height of Cold War tensions as a potential shelter in case of nuclear war, Östermalmstorg features the work of Derkert one of Sweden’s most famous artists in the century

T-Centralen

The art of the Stockholm metro – in pictures

From a fake underground grotto to giant bronze tulips, murals making statements on ecology to work by ‘the Swedish Banksy’, Stockholm’s metro stations are full of surprises. All photographs by Luis Rodriguez

Universitetet  V on Linné was a Swedish biologist, now known as the father of modern taxonomy. Schein used his travels and discoveries as a starting point to explore many of the ecological problems currently facing modern society

The art of the Stockholm metro – in pictures

Universitetet V on Linné was a Swedish biologist, now known as the father of modern taxonomy. Schein used his travels and discoveries as a starting point to explore many of the ecological problems currently facing modern society

Universitetet  Universitetet – Françoise Schein This tiled mural on the wall behind the station’s tracks is called The UN Declaration of Human Rights. Created by Belgian/Parisien artist Schein, one of the few non-Swedes to design part of the Stockholm subway, it consists of 12 panels describing the travels of Carl von Linné across the Baltic

The art of the Stockholm metro – in pictures

From a fake underground grotto to giant bronze tulips, murals making statements on ecology to work by ‘the Swedish Banksy’, Stockholm’s metro stations are full of surprises.

Telefonplan  Telefonplan – Bo Samuelsson These images may bring to mind Banksy, but they were actually created by Swedish artist Bo Samuelsson (1997). Called My Friends are Your Friends, these screen-printed images along the ceramic wall tiles of the station, are meant to reflect the transformation experienced by this part of Stockholm, from an industrial workplace to an arty, cultural district which now holds Stockholm’s College of Art and Design

The art of the Stockholm metro – in pictures

Stadion  The rainbow colours against the blue marbled rock walls at Stadion represent the five rings of the Olympic movement

The art of the Stockholm metro – in pictures

Stadion The rainbow colours against the blue marbled rock walls at Stadion represent the five rings of the Olympic movement

Stadion Stadion – Enno Hallek and Åke Pallarp Hallek and Pallarp’s colourful 1973 designs celebrate the 1912 Olympics which Stockholm hosted in a stadium not far from this site, and the nearby Royal College of Music

The art of the Stockholm metro – in pictures

From a fake underground grotto to giant bronze tulips, murals making statements on ecology to work by ‘the Swedish Banksy’, Stockholm’s metro stations are full of surprises.

Kungsträdgården Kungsträdgården – Ulrik Samuelson In 1977, Samuelson transformed the station into an underground garden to reflect the rich history of this Stockholm suburb and the former 17th-century Makalos palace, built on the same site for one of Sweden’s most famous families, before being destroyed in 1825 following a fire

The art of the Stockholm metro – in pictures

From a fake underground grotto to giant bronze tulips, murals making statements on ecology to work by ‘the Swedish Banksy’, Stockholm’s metro stations are full of surprises. All photographs by Luis Rodriguez

Svedmyra Svedmyra – Torgny Larsson Larsson’s (1991) 40m long glass screen alongside the tracks contains pictures of various leaves found across Stockholm. As the light shifts throughout the afternoon, the changing colours make the leaf veins appear more prominently, just as they do in a real leaf as you tilt it towards the sun

The art of the Stockholm metro – in pictures

From a fake underground grotto to giant bronze tulips, murals making statements on ecology to work by ‘the Swedish Banksy’, Stockholm’s metro stations are full of surprises.

Solna centrum  Scenes throughout the Solna Centrum mural carry messages against the rural depopulation and environmental changes which were occurring across Sweden at the time

The art of the Stockholm metro – in pictures

From a fake underground grotto to giant bronze tulips, murals making statements on ecology to work by ‘the Swedish Banksy’, Stockholm’s metro stations are full of surprises.

Solna centrum  Solna Centrum – Karl-Olov Björk and Anders Åberg Björk and Åberg (1975) used this station as a political statement for the environmental movement. A spruce forest runs for almost 1,000 metres along the walls of the statement, underneath a blood-red sky

The art of the Stockholm metro – in pictures

Solna centrum Solna Centrum – Karl-Olov Björk and Anders Åberg Björk and Åberg used this station as a political statement for the environmental movement. A spruce forest runs for almost metres along the walls of the statement, underneath a blood-red sky

Tekniska högskolan Tekniska Högskolan station

The art of the Stockholm metro – in pictures

From a fake underground grotto to giant bronze tulips, murals making statements on ecology to work by ‘the Swedish Banksy’, Stockholm’s metro stations are full of surprises. All photographs by Luis Rodriguez

Skarpnäck Skarpnäck – Richard Nonas The heavy red colours throughout this station pay homage to the distinctive brick architecture throughout the suburb. Sculptor Nonas (1994) created 17 bench-like structures in a line along the platform which act as makeshift seats

The art of the Stockholm metro – in pictures

From a fake underground grotto to giant bronze tulips, murals making statements on ecology to work by ‘the Swedish Banksy’, Stockholm’s metro stations are full of surprises. All photographs by Luis Rodriguez

Rådhuset Rådhuset – Sigvard Olsson This station lies on the island of Kungsholmen, first inhabited by Franciscan monks in the mid 15th century. Olsson (1975) created a pink underground grotto, complete with various imaginary archeological findings, including baskets from the medieval market and the plinth of a huge chimney stack

The art of the Stockholm metro – in pictures

Rådhuset station, Stockholm metro Sigvard Olsson modelled Rådhuset station as a pink underground grotto, complete with imaginary archeological findings, in Photograph: Luis Rodriguez

Fridhemsplan  Fridhemsplan – Ingegerd Möller and Torsten Renqvist Möller and Renqvist created an array of exhibits around the station relating to the sea (1975), pointing to the ongoing protests at the time from conservationists. This particular glass case holds a small sailing boat or blekingeeka

The art of the Stockholm metro – in pictures

From a fake underground grotto to giant bronze tulips, murals making statements on ecology to work by ‘the Swedish Banksy’, Stockholm’s metro stations are full of surprises.

Kungsträdgården  Like many of the stations built in the 1970s, Kungsträdgården resembles a concrete underground cave. Samuelson used spray paints to wash the walls with colour. As passengers descend down the escalators, the patterns on the ceiling resemble a keyboard

The art of the Stockholm metro – in pictures

From a fake underground grotto to giant bronze tulips, murals making statements on ecology to work by ‘the Swedish Banksy’, Stockholm’s metro stations are full of surprises. All photographs by Luis Rodriguez

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